Saving Your Home From Foreclosure

If you are having trouble keeping up with your mortgage payments or you have been notified of your lender's intent to initiate foreclosure, don't feel as though you have no other option than to give up your home. Filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy stops any collection activity against you, including foreclosure, and can give you the time you need to create a plan to save your home.

There may be nothing more difficult than facing the possibility of losing your home to foreclosure. Many people do not understand their rights in these matters and feel helpless to take action once their lenders have decided to foreclose. At the Law Offices of Charles A. Maglieri, I help my clients find debt relief solutions that allow them to get caught up on their mortgage payments and keep their homes.

How Bankruptcy Can Protect Homeowners' Interests

Chapter 13 bankruptcy not only stops any foreclosure proceeding in progress against you, but it also provides several other important benefits. In addition to the debts you are able to discharge as part of the bankruptcy, Chapter 13 allows you to repay your mortgage arrearages as part of your repayment plan.

As long as you are able to make your regular mortgage payments going forward, the risk of foreclosure should no longer be a concern. When you choose me as your bankruptcy attorney, I will take a comprehensive approach to debt relief, going beyond addressing the foreclosure issue. I will seek a complete solution that puts you in the best financial situation possible.

Discuss Your Case With A Hartford County Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Lawyer

Contact my office to discuss your questions about saving your home from foreclosure through bankruptcy. I offer a free initial consultation to all new clients. I am available during regular business hours and by appointment at other times. You can reach me by phone at 860-952-3674 or via email.

My law firm is a debt relief agency as so designated by Congress in the year 2005. I help people file for bankruptcy relief under Title 11 of the United States Code, known as the Bankruptcy Code.